Finding an Occupational Therapist or Health Professional

As a mum of a little guy who has needed some extra help, I know it’s hard finding the right support for your child.  Parents often ask me how to find a good occupational therapist and make sense of their qualifications.  Here are my suggestions from both personal and professional experience:

1)   ****FOLLOW YOUR GUT*****:   You will have a feeling by talking to a therapist whether they are right for you.  Personally, I prefer to talk via phone to potential therapists for my child versus emailing or texting as it has given me a good feel for them.  Also, by watching my child interact with the therapist and see how comfortable they are, I just know! 🙂

2)  BASIC REGISTRATION:

In the UK, occupational therapists must be registered with the Health Professions Council.

In the US, occupational therapists are registered with the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy.

3)    ADVANCED CERTIFICATIONS:

Pediatric occupational therapists can go for many higher level intense accreditations based on their special interests.  Personally, my treatments and assessments became much more thorough and effective after undergoing these certifications, resulting in faster progress.  Two main certifications to look for are:

-Sensory Integration – In the UK, there are a series of four courses offered through the Sensory Integration Network.  In the US, these courses may be offered by either Western Psychological Services or Sensory Integration International.  Have a look here to learn more.   It can take years to complete the coursework and all the requirements to pass and become certified in Sensory Integration.

-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment) Certification also known as Bobath Approach.  This is an 8-week course for children with Cerebral Palsy or any motor impairment.  For me, the course was a labour of love & rather intensive.  Therapists often make some sort of life compromise to complete the certification such as temporarily moving to the town where the course is being held, or leaving their families for long periods of time.  For therapists who are NDT certified in the US, this requires a continuous process of updating information via ongoing continuing education and professional development.  You can learn more here

Personally, I moved to Chicago to complete my coursework and had a brilliant time exploring the city and enjoying stuffed pizza whilst studying during every other spare moment. 🙂

– NDTA Advanced Baby Course – 2 to 3 weeks – This certificate course can only be taken after the 8-week course above and is an add-on to specialize further into baby treatment.  I took mine in what felt like the boonies, Allentown PA, however it was completely worthwhile to have spent this time with baby guru, Lois Bly.

4)    CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – I would look to see that the therapist takes ongoing continuing education courses in a variety of areas.  I list most of my CPD on my ‘About Me’ section under CV for others to see how I stay current.

5)    EXPERIENCE:  What’s their experience?  How long?  Where?  What population do they work with?

6)    SPECIAL INTERESTS:   Do their special interests relate to your child’s needs?  E.G. Baby treatment, pediatrics, splinting, kinesio taping, seating and wheelchairs, assistive technology, home modifications, oral motor / feeding therapy, listening therapies, yoga, brain gym and so much more.

7)  LISTENS TO YOU:  I find it encouraging when our team members listen to and involve us.  After all, parents know their child best.

8)  CREATIVITY:  Fancy clinic equipment is great however I have seen great therapists do so much while working in a shoebox or with very little.  Creativity goes a long way.

9)  COST – Personally, I have found it so worthwhile to have fewer sessions with a more skilled therapist versus more sessions with less skilled ones.  It’s important to look at the therapist’s credentials, approach and personality to find a good fit.